TitleCreatorInstitutionBodyDate Last UpdatedResource TypeCoverageRelated ResourcesContributorsKeywordsRights managementData & PapersRelated WikisExperimental SetupLab FacilitiesMethod
Floc growth rate and size as a function of sediment concentrationKyle StromVirginia Tech

All data in this repository is associated with the following paper:

Data from the paper: Tran, D. and Strom, K. (2017). Suspended clays and silts: Are they independent or dependent fractions when it comes to settling in a turbulent suspension? Continental Shelf Research, 138, 81-94, doi: 10.1016/j.csr.2017.02.011.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.2301063, -80.42421339999999

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Name: 
Kyle Strom
Institution: 
Virginia Tech
contributor_email: 
strom@vt.edu
Flocculation, MudCC-BY
Virginia Tech
TDB_15_1, Tulane Delta BasinYu, Liz, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-15-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 12.25 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Yu, L., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB_15_1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M00V89W1.

Friday, August 18, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 18, 2017
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB_14_2, Tulane Delta BasinLi, Qi, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-14-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 6.125 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Li., Q., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB_14_2, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M0RF5S4H.

Friday, August 18, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 18, 2017
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB_14_1, Tulane Delta BasinLi, Qi, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-14-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 630 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 24.5 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Li., Q., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB_14_1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M0MP51D5.

Friday, August 18, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 18, 2017
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB_13_1, Tulane Delta BasinLi, Qi, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-13-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1000 hr. Experiment was divided into 2 stages. The first stage used a weakly cohesive sediment while the second stage used a moderately cohesive sediment. Both sediment mixtures had wide grain size distributions with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Li, Q., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB_13_1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M07D2S7Q.

Friday, August 18, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 18, 2017
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB_12_1, Tulane Delta BasinLi, Qi, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-12-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 0.25 (mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1285 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Li, Q., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB_12_1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M03N21GX.

Friday, August 18, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 18, 2017
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB-11-1, Tulane Delta BasinWang, Yinan, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-11-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 77.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Wang, Y., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB-11-1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M0D50K3T.

Monday, August 7, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2011 to Sunday, January 15, 2012
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, Conveyor belt flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB-10-2, Tulane Delta BasinWang, Yinan, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-10-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.022 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 10 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 39.3 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Wang, Y., and Straub, K.M., 2017, TDB-10-2, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M0W37TFH.

Monday, August 7, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Monday, December 20, 2010 to Friday, March 18, 2011
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
TDB-10-1, Tulane Delta BasinWang, Yinan, Straub, Kyle M.Tulane University

TDB-10-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.451 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 78.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Wang, Y., and Straub, K.M, 2017, TDB-10-1, SEAD, http://doi.org/10.5967/M0HX19TT.

Monday, August 7, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 29.9403477, -90.12072790000002

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, August 5, 2008 to Monday, September 22, 2008
Name: 
Straub, Kyle M.
Institution: 
Tulane University
contributor_email: 
kmstraub@tulane.edu
experiment, delta, flumeCC0
Tulane University
Meandering River Experimental VideoChristian BraudrickUniversity of California, Berkeley

Overhead video of meandering river experiments with constant discharge and sediment supply. Flow is from left to right. 

Wednesday, May 24, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.9170318, -122.32984750000003

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017
Name: 
Christian Braudrick
Institution: 
Utah State University
contributor_email: 
cbraudrick@gmail.com
meandering, experiment, alfalfa, vegetation, fluvial, flume, movieCC-BY
Richmond Field Station at The University of California, Berkeley
Ensemble Distributions of Particle MotionsFathel, Siobhan L., David, Furbish J., Schmeeckle, Mark W. Vanderbilt University, Arizona State University

Data here was collected at the River Dynamics Laboratory at Arizona State University.  Measurements of particle motions were obtained using a manual tracking method within the program ImageJ.  The data include 1250 frames or 5 seconds of high-speed imagery, associated coordinates of particle motions, and derived measurements of particle motions (e.g. instantaneous velocities, particle accelerations, hop distances, and travel times).  

Monday, February 6, 2017collection
Dates Collected: 
Monday, February 6, 2017
Name: 
Siobhan Fathel
Institution: 
Vanderbilt University
contributor_email: 
siobhan.fathel@gmail.com
sediment transport, flume, ensemble distributionsCC-BY
Recirculating Flume – River Dynamics Laboratory at Arizona State UniversityManual Measurements of Distributions of Particle MotionsHigh-Speed Imaging and Manual Tracking of Sediment Transport
Data for Experiments on Massive Deposits in Upper RegimeHernandez Moreira, Ricardo, R. University of South Carolina, ColumbiaFriday, January 27, 2017dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 33.989864, -81.02733899999998

Dates Collected: 
Friday, January 27, 2017
Name: 
Hernandez Moreira, Ricardo, R.
Institution: 
University of South Carolina, Columbia
contributor_email: 
hernanrr@email.sc.edu
CC-BYUniversity of South Carolina, Columbia Hydraulics Laboratory
Steadiness of dilute, particle-laden density currentsAndrews, Benjamin J. Smithsonian Institution

We conducted experiments to examine how steadiness-unsteadiness of source parameters is reflected in density currents in air. We ran experiments with other wise steady supply broken by two intervals (e.g. 30-10-30-10-30, or 30-5-30-5-30, where currents were supplied for 3 intervals of 30 s separated by 10 or 5 second pauses). 

Experiments were monitored using orthgonal laser sheets, with video data recorded in the streamwise vertical and horizontal planes; data have been orthorectified and processed for turbulent timescales and Feature-tracking-velocimetry velocity fields. Temeprature data were recorded at 3 Hz using 0.001" K-type thermocouples. 

Please contact Ben Andrews for access to data: andrewsb@si.edu  

Tuesday, January 17, 2017dataset
Dates Collected: 
Thursday, January 15, 2015 to Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Name: 
Benjamin Andrews
Institution: 
Smithsonian Institution
contributor_email: 
andrewsb@si.edu
density currents, pyroclastic, turbulenceData are property of Smithsonian Institution, but may be used for research and educational purposes with permission of authorSmithsonian InstitutionParticle-laden density currents in air
Distribution of particle excursion lengths across a wide range of Rouse numbersSuleyman NaqshbandUniversity of Wyoming

Particle motion and travel lengths were measured for a wide range of flow conditions using a recirculating plexiglass flume at the University of Wyoming. The flume was 3.25 m x 0.1 m with an effective measuring section of 2.45 m. A series of 8 video cameras was installed each covering 20.0 cm streamwise distance of the effective measuring length and 15.0 cm in the vertical. Each camera imaged at 25 frames per second with 1080x1920 pixel resolution covering a total length of 1.60 m that provided the basis for tracking particle motions over relatively large distances. The test section of 1.60 m was located 0.80 m downstream from the flow entrance to ensure fully developed turbulence.Experiments were carried out in dark under black lights with fluorescent painted plastic and sand particles.

 

Sunday, September 18, 2016dataset
Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 to Wednesday, June 1, 2016
Name: 
Brandon McElroy, Robert C. Mahon
Institution: 
University of Wyoming
contributor_email: 
BMcElroy@uwyo.edu
RMahon1@uwyo.edu
particle dynamics, particle motion, excursion lengthCC-BY
University of Wyoming
Experiments on the morphodynamics of alluvial-bedrock transitionsSadegh Jafarinik, Ricardo Hernandez Moreira, Enrica ViparelliUniversity of South Carolina

The data have been measured during mixed bedrock-alluvial experiments at the Hydraulic Laboratory of the University of South Carolina (Oct 15-May 16). The data include water surface elevation, Grain size distribution of the bed surface and parent material, bed surface elevation and some videos showing the alluvial-bedrock transitions and Paralaminations. There is also a powerpoint file which explains all the data in details. 

Monday, September 5, 2016
Location: 

Geolocation is 33.9899258, -81.02804500000002

Dates Collected: 
Friday, October 2, 2015 to Sunday, May 15, 2016
Name: 
Sadegh Jafarinik
Institution: 
Universoty of South Carolina
contributor_email: 
jafarinm@email.sc.edu
The morphology of mixed bedrock-alluvial low slope systemsCC-BY
Grainsize transition with sea-level riseKim, Wonsuck, Baumanis, CarolinaUniversity of Texas, Austin

A set of flume experiments to examine the grain-size transition migration in response to sea level rise. 

Read more about the experiments:

Baumanis, C. and Kim, W. (2016), Reverse migration of lithofacies boundaries and shoreline in response to sea-level rise. Basin Res. doi:10.1111/bre.12209

Thursday, July 21, 2016dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.28571386684493, -97.73661732673645

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 to Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Name: 
Kim, Wonsuck
Institution: 
University of Texas, Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
delta, flume, experiment, grainsize, sea level, experimental stratigraphyCC-BY
Density Current Confluence Velocity DataIsmail, Hassan, Imran, Jasim, Viparelli, EnricaUniversity of South Carolina

Data collected and processed by H. Ismail et al during density current confluence experiments at the University of South Carolina Hydraulics Lab (2013-2015). In all files, x, y, and z denote down-stream, cross-channel, and vertical coordinates, respectively. The origin is the upstream junction point on the flume bed. u and v denote velocity in the x and y directions, respectively. U and H are depth-averaged velocity and current thickness, respectively.

"vertical-profiles-u.xlsx" contains down-stream (u) velocity versus distance from the bed at 9 locations along the main channel centerline.
"horizontal-u.xlsx" and "horizontal-v.xlsx" contain measurements of down-stream (u) and cross-channel (v) data at 3000 data points located on five horizontal planes in the vicinity of the junction in the main channel.
"layer-averaged.xlsx" contains computed depth-averaged velocity and current thickness for each profile defined by the data in "vertical-profiles-u.xlsx".

Friday, July 1, 2016dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 34.6694235, -82.8269201

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2013 to Thursday, January 1, 2015
Name: 
Ismail, Hassan
Institution: 
University of South Carolina
density current, river confluence, sediment transport, seafloor morphology, confluenceCC-BY
Fold erosion by an antecedent riverBufe, AaronSaint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN

This collection contains the photographs and the topographic scans of the experiments published in Bufe A., Paola C., Burbank D.W., 2016. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate. Nature Geoscience., 9(9), 706-710, doi:10.1038/ngeo2773.

For each experiment photographs were taken at regular intervals with a 10.5-mm, f/2.8 fisheye lens mounted on a DSLR camera. Fisheye distortion was removed using the inbuilt lens correction in Photoshop CS6 and were tilted such that the average slope of the alluvial fan is horizontal. Photos taken while the water was not running or when the dye feed was interrupted were not used. Moreover, for Run 4 only photographs from the first 25 h of runtime were processed and uploaded to the repository. All raw unprocessed images can be obtained upon request.

Topographic data of the basin were acquired using a custom built laser scanner that was programmed to cover the entire basin except for its upper ~5% (~25 cm), in six swaths. The scans are provided as .dat file and have 4672 by 3001 mm2 sized pixels.

To open the datafile in MATLAB :

id=fopen(‘filename’,'r')

A=fread(id,[4672 3001],'float');

fclose(id);

The Metadata for the experiments is summarized in an excel spreadsheet. For each run there are entries about the input parameters as well as the timing of uplift events and the timing of topographic scans.

Sunday, June 12, 2016dataset
Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, September 30, 2014 to Saturday, November 15, 2014
Name: 
Bufe, Aaron
Institution: 
University of California Santa Barbara
contributor_email: 
aaronbufe@gmail.com
tectonic geomorphology, fluvial, erosion, Fan, fold, channel mobilityCC-BY
Time-lapse images from SEN-CSDMS rigid lid experimentPositive FeedbackSEN-CSDMS Group 2

Prograding delta built under a stationary lid to simulate the back-pressure of a backwater effect. Delta built with:

  • Dyed water
  • Plastic, colored sediments

This delta was built in a "desktop experiment" as part of the CSDMS-SEN 2016 meeting.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 40.0096095, -105.24228490000002

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
Mouth bar, delta, desktop experiment, traveling experiment, time-lapse images, plastic sedimentsCC-BY
Table Top Delta Basin with Rigid Lid, Digital Camera (Canon G1X), Sediment Feeder, Silo, Muto Bottle
Delta VegPiliouras, AnastasiaUniversity of Texas at Austin

Experiments conducted with alfalfa to observe how plants change delta growth and dynamics. There are 6 runs. Runs 1-4 have constant discharge, Runs 5-6 have fluctuating discharge. Runs 1 and 5 are control runs with no plants, and Runs 2-4 and 6 have plants with varying growing conditions. All experiments have 2cm water depth and 150um silica sand. The data and more details can be found on the SEN SEAD page, or contact anastasia.piliouras@gmail.com to obtain the dataset.

Thursday, October 15, 2015
Dates Collected: 
Sunday, January 1, 2012 to Thursday, August 1, 2013
delta, vegetationCC-BY
Ice Delta ExperimentsLim, YeJin, Kim, Wonsuck The University of Texas at Austin

We conducted a set of ice-covered delta experiments at the University of Texas at Austin to investigate the changes in delta morphology and associated depositional processes as a result of interaction with ice cover. Please use SEAD SEN collection link to obstain full dataset.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2849185, -97.7340567

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Name: 
Levy, Joseph
,
Name: 
Goudge, Timothy
delta, ice-covered delta, arctic, polar regionsCC-BY
Meandering Rivers Experiments: Carbonate Precipitation ProcessLim, YeJin, Kim, Wonsuck The University of Texas at Austin

We conducted a set of carbonate experiments in the Chemo-MorphoDynamics (CMD) flume at the University of Texas at Austin to investigate the formation and evolution of a single-thread meander pattern without vegetation. These experiments successfully created a single-thread meandering pattern through chemical processes. Carbonate deposits focused along the channel sides improved the bank stability and made them resistant to erosion, which led to a stream confined in a narrow path. The experimental channels showed lateral migration of the bend through cut bank and point bar deposits. Channel avulsion and chute cutoff were also observed. Please contact YeJin Lim (yjlim322@utexas.edu) to obtain full dataset.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Dates Collected: 
Monday, October 27, 2014 to Wednesday, October 29, 2014
,
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2849185, -97.7340567

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Meandering Rivers, Meanders, Carbonate Precipitation, MarsCC-BY
Hydrodynamics at Shoal E, Cape Canaveral shoals (Fall 2013, Spring 2014, and Fall 2014 Experiments)Paniagua-Arroyave, Juan F., Adams, Peter N., Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo, Parra, Sabrina M.University of Florida, EAFIT University

During Fall 2013, Spring 2014, and Fall 2014 acoustic Doppler current profilers were moored in the inner and outer swales of Shoal E, offshore Cape Canaveral, in the Florida Atlantic coast. 

Wednesday, October 14, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 28.42811871453479, -80.4690170288086

Dates Collected: 
Monday, September 23, 2013 to Sunday, December 1, 2013
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 to Monday, June 2, 2014
Friday, October 10, 2014 to Thursday, November 13, 2014
Name: 
Paniagua-Arroyave, Juan F.
Institution: 
University of Florida
contributor_email: 
jf.paniagua@ufl.edu
field experiments, inner-shelf processes, surface gravity waves, tidesBOEM owns copyrights of these data.
Dunes on SaltPiliouras, AnastasiaUniversity of Texas at Austin

We conducted experiments of dunes sitting on a mobile substrate to determine how the ratio of sand to salt thickness controlled dune subsidence. Experiments were conducted in a small tank using PDMS as a proxy for salt. A single dune (a cross-section of a linear dune, as linear dunes were thought to be on top of salt in the Gulf of Mexico) was deposited rapidly on top of the polymer and allowed to subside over time. We have raw time lapse images from two experiments with two different thickness ratios. Please contact anastasia.piliouras@gmail.com to obtain the dataset, or data can be downloaded on the SEAD page at: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09K487M

Wednesday, September 30, 2015dataset
Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2011 to Friday, November 18, 2011
,
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.38769079999999, -97.72818740000002

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017
Name: 
Anastasia Piliouras
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
anastasia.piliouras@gmail.com
dunes, Salt, subsidenceCC-BY
Erosional landscape topographySweeney, Kristin E.St. Anthony Falls Laboratory

These data consist of digitial elevation models of experimental topography recorded at 5 - 10 minute intervals during a series of experiments combining hillslope diffusion and channel incision in a meter-scale eroding landscape. The data were processed from the raw returns of a SICK laser scanner; processing includes noise removal and some interpolation for missing data. DEMs of the steady-state topography for each run are available for download at http://dx.doi.org/10.5967/M09P2ZM3.

Friday, September 25, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823831, -93.25481289999999

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 to Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Name: 
Sweeney, Kristin E.
Institution: 
U.S. Geological Survey
contributor_email: 
kristin.e.sweeney@gmail.com
hillslope diffusion, channel incision, mountain buildingCC-BY
Field saltation observationsRaleigh L MartinUniversity of California, Los Angeles

Raw and processed data from three field campaigns on active aeolian saltation:

  • Jericoacoara, Ceara, Brazil, November 2014
  • Rancho Guadalupe, California, USA, March 2015
  • Oceano, California, USA, May-June 2015

Data can be accessed through Google Drive.

"Raw" data folder contain both:

  • unedited ascii outputs (.dat) from Campbell CR1000/CR3000 dataloggers connected to field instruments, and
  • outputs from Camsizer grain-size analysis instrument on samples collected from field sites

"Processed" data are MATLAB binary format (.mat) and are ready for data analysis.

All metadata and scripts upon which raw data were transformed to processed data are contained in Github repositories (Jericoacoara repository, Rancho Guadalupe repository, Oceano repository).

Sunday, September 13, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is -2.79673683438941, -40.48335313796997

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, November 13, 2014 to Sunday, September 20, 2015
Monday, March 23, 2015 to Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Friday, May 15, 2015 to Thursday, June 4, 2015
Name: 
Raleigh L Martin
Institution: 
University of California, Los Angeles
contributor_email: 
raleighmartin@gmail.com
aeolian processes, saltation, sediment transport, fieldworkCC-BY
Data for experiments in high-intensity bedload transportHernandez Moreira, Ricardo, R.University of South Carolina Columbia

[To be revised shortly. ]

Contents of the dataset include: 

 

  1. Profile data: CSV files of water surface elevation and bed elevatio taken during the experiments. 
  2. Sonar data: CSV files of instantaneous realizations of bed elevations taken during the experiments. 

 

All data files are as-is. No processing has been done to them, so they still include glitches and noise. 

Tuesday, September 1, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 33.989864, -81.02733899999998

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, June 24, 2014 to Friday, August 21, 2015
Name: 
Ricardo Hernandez
Institution: 
University of South Carolina Columbia
contributor_email: 
hernanrr@email.sc.edu
upper plane bed, sheet flowCC-BY
Bedform Dynamics and Stratigraphy Experimental DataMahon, Robert C., McElroy, BrandonUniversity of Wyoming

Ongoing experiments to develop and validate models for reconstructing paleohydraulics and sediment transport from sandy fluvial cross set strata. Experiments are being conducted in the University of Wyoming Water Resources Facility's 7.3-meter recirculating flume channel.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 41.3147370915733, -105.58197140693699

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, July 7, 2015 to Friday, September 16, 2016
Name: 
Robert Mahon
Institution: 
University of Wyoming
contributor_email: 
rmahon1@uwyo.edu
stratigraphy, bedforms, fluvial, flume, cross setsCC-BY
Bedform Dynamics and Stratigraphy Experimental Set-upUniversity of Wyoming
Delta shoreline completeness - Experiments and modelsMahon, Robert C., Shaw, John B. , Barnhart, Katherine R. , Hobley, Daniel E. J. , McElroy, BrandonUniversity of Wyoming, University of Arkansas, University of Colorado, Boulder, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Models for determining stratigraphic completeness of shoreline trajectories from delta experiments. Dataset includes shoreline trajectories from an experimental delta constructed as part of the 2013 NCED Summer Institute on Earth Surface Dynamics at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. Models and data from the following publication:

Quantifying the stratigraphic completeness of delta shoreline trajectories: Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (2015), v. 120, doi:10.1002/2014JF003298.

Thursday, June 18, 2015collection
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9825501, -93.25510780000002

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015
Name: 
Mahon, Robert C.
Institution: 
University of Wyoming
contributor_email: 
rmahon1@uwyo.edu
stratigraphic completeness, experimental stratigraphy, delta, shoreline trajectory, forward modelingCC-BY
St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at The University of Minnesota
Rheology of sediment transport by a laminar flow Morgane Houssais, Carlos Ortiz, Douglas Jerolmack, Douglas DurianUniversity of Pennsylvania
In this experiment, a laminar flow shear a bed of particles, which are fully tracked, using Refractive Index Matching, and image analysis.

Dataset corresponding to data represented in the paper published at Nature Communications:

Onset of sediment transport is a continuous transition driven by fluid shear and granular creep
by Morgane Houssais, Carlos P. Ortiz, Douglas J. Durian, and Douglas J. Jerolmack

The full rheology measurements were published a year later, by the same authors, in Physical Review E: https://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.94.062609  

Sunday, March 15, 2015dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 39.9522188, -75.1932137

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, March 15, 2015
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
granular flow, suspension flow, local rheology, annular flume, laminar, refractive index matching, bed load transportCC-BY
Minibasin Formation Due to Sediment Loading Over a Mobile SubstrateBrandon MintonThe University of Texas at AustinWednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.3877436, -97.72813300000001

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Brandon Minton
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
brandonminton@austin.utexas.edu
turbidity, mobile substrate, subsidence, minibasinCC-BY
Architecture of a Delta Prograding on a Mobile SubstrateJung, EunsilThe University of Texas at AustinWednesday, December 3, 2014
Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Kim, Wonsuck
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
delta, mobile substrate, SaltCC-BY
Delft3D_TidesRossi, Valentina M.Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Edmonds, Douglas
Institution: 
Indiana University
contributor_email: 
edmondsd@indiana.edu
,
Name: 
Kim, Wonsuck
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
CC-BY
Lateral-tilting basinWoong Mo KooThe University of Texas at AustinWednesday, December 3, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2849185, -97.7340567

Dates Collected: 
Monday, October 6, 2014 to Monday, November 17, 2014
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
,
Name: 
Valentina Rossi
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
Deepwater deposits, lateral-tiltingCC-BY
Flood/Interflood Delta Evolution Experiments in STEP BasinLitwin Miller, KimberlyUniversity of Texas at AustinWednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Kimberly Miller
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
litwinmiller@jsg.utexas.edu
,
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
delta, Floods, Walnut ShellCC-BY
VeggieTales experimentsPiliouras, AnastasiaUniversity of Texas at Austin

We examined the effects of vegetation, vegetation density, and veg location on overall delta and channel dynamics. We conducted a series of experiments with a variety of seeding styles, including 1 unvegetated control run. Experiments were all conducted under the same water and sediment input conditions, with vegetation as the only variable.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2806543, -97.7327641

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, September 1, 2013 to Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Name: 
Anastasia Piliouras
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
anastasia.piliouras@gmail.com
delta, vegetationCC-BY
The Progradation of a Delta on a Mobile Substrate: ExperimentCarolina BaumanisUniversity of Texas at Austin

We conducted a series of experiments at the University of Texas at Austin to discover the effect of a mobile substrate on an evolving delta. All of the runs had constant sediment supply, water supply, and base level, but varied mobile substrate thicknesses.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.3953085, -97.73627420000003

Dates Collected: 
Friday, June 1, 2012 to Friday, August 10, 2012
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
stratigraphy, progradation, mobile substrate, experiment, deltaCC-BY
Laboratory experiments simulating the geomorphic response to tectonic upliftLague, Dimitri, Crave, Alain, Davy, PhilippeGeosciences Rennes

We present the results of an experimental study of topography dynamics under conditions of constant precipitation and uplift rate. The experiment is designed to develop a complete drainage network by the growth and propagation of erosion instabilities in response to tectonic perturbations. The quantitative analysis of topographic evolution is made possible by using telemetric lasers that perform elevation measurements at an excellent level of precision. We focus our study on the effect of initial surface organization and of uplift rate on both the transient dynamics and the steady state forms of topography. We show that the transient phase is strongly dependent on the initial internally drained area, which is found to decrease exponentially with time. The topography always reaches a steady state whose mean elevation depends linearly on uplift rate with a strictly positive value when uplift is zero. Steady state surfaces are characterized by a well-defined slope–area power law with a constant exponent of 0.12 and an amplitude that depends linearly on uplift rate with a strictly positive value when uplift is zero. These results are consistent with a stream power law erosion model that includes a nonnegligible threshold for particle detachment. Uncertainty regarding the sediment transport length is resolved by calibrating the transient dynamics with a surface process model. Reappraising published results on the linear dependency between mean elevation, or relief, and denudation rate, we suggest that an erosion threshold is worth considering for large-scale systems.

Sunday, November 30, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 48.1132044, -1.6616030999999793

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, November 30, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
landscape evolution, topography, relief, experimental modeling, tectonic geomorphologyCC-BY
Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifugeHung, Chi-Yao; Stark, Colin P., Capart, H.; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments.  We scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking, and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. 
 
For more information, contact Colin Stark at - cstark@ldeo.columbia.edu.
Monday, November 10, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 40.8092739, -73.9598315

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, August 1, 2013 to Monday, November 10, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
debris flow, erosion, analogue modeling, physical modelingCC-BY
Basin Depth Control on the Fluvial Autogenic Processes of Deltaic SystemsKim, Wonsuck, Carlson, BrandeeUniversity of Texas at Austin

Data includes results from a series of delta-building experiments designed to determine the response of these internal processes and timescales to varying basin water depth. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2806543, -97.7327641

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 to Thursday, November 6, 2014
delta, STEP, basin depthCC-BY
Sorting in Flash Flood Bore ExperimentsKealie GoodwinUniversity of Texas at Austin

Laboratory experiments which use a series of truncated bores to understand the effects of steep water surface slope on gravel bed armor development. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Name: 
Kealie Goodwin
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu
flash flood, gravel, bed sorting, armoring, kinetic sieving, selective transportCC-BY
SEN Community Experiment at Utrecht UniversitySediment ExperimentalistsUtrecht University

Community experiment at Utrecht University, two deltas, one on a mobile substrate. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 52.0880383030119, 5.166864752736728

Dates Collected: 
Monday, November 3, 2014 to Thursday, November 6, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
delta, mobile substrate, EurotankCC-BY
Bedload transport though vegetationYager, Elowyn M., Schmeeckle, Mark Arizona State University

Experiments using simulated vegetation to understand how different vegetation densities (0-4% density by area) modify near-bed flow turbulence, flow structures and bedload transport.  Data include spatial variation in bedload fluxes around vegetation and total bedload fluxes measured using high-speed video for 12 runs.  Near-bed flow instantaneous velocities and velocity profiles (streamwise and vertical directions) were also measured in 3 streamwise transects using PIV. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 33.4255104, -111.94000540000002

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, January 1, 2006 to Friday, June 1, 2007
Name: 
Elowyn Yager
Institution: 
University of Idaho
contributor_email: 
eyager@uidaho.edu
bedload, vegetation, turbulence, flow structuresCC-BY
Bedrock erosion by granular flow in the Maytag flumeHsu, LeslieUniversity of California, Berkeley
We conducted laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that bedrock erosion is related to grain collisional stresses which scale with shear rate and particle size. We placed granular material in a 56-cm-diameter rotating drum to explore the relationship between erosion of a synthetic bedrock sample and variables such as grain size, shear rate, water content, and bed strength. Grain collisional stresses are estimated as the inertial stress using the product of the squares of particle size and vertical shear rate. Our uniform granular material consisted of 1-mm sand and quartzite river gravel with means of 4, 6, or 10 mm. In 67 experimental runs, the eroded depth of the bed sample varied with inertial stresses in the granular flow to a power less than 1.0 and inversely with the bed strength. The flows tended to slip on smooth boundaries, resulting in higher erosion rates than no-slip cases. We found that lateral wall resistance generated shear across the channel, producing two cells whose widths depended on wall roughness.
Tuesday, November 4, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.9153639, -122.33468490000001

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2003 to Thursday, January 1, 2004
Name: 
Hsu, Leslie
Institution: 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
contributor_email: 
hsu.leslie@gmail.com
granular flow, gravel, bedrock, erosionCC-BY
Bed load transport in steep boulder bed channelsYager, ElowynUniversity of California, Berkeley

We designed a set of flume experiments with a simple, well-defined bed configuration to test our modified sediment transport equation. The experiments were conducted in a small (15 cm wide, 4.5 m long) flume set at a gradient of ten percent. This is the steepest gradient at which fluvial processes have been hypothesized to dominate over debris flow scour and deposition. At this gradient, the influence of the immobile grains on the flow and sediment transport will be relatively large. Thus our experiments should provide a test of sediment transport equations at the limit of their applicability. We maintained a constant slope in our experiments to enable comparisons between all experimental runs. The flume bed consisted of two layers of 30 mm immobile spheres: a closely packed bottom layer (λ/D of 1) and a top layer in which λ/D varied from 1 to 5 in the different runs. (Yager et al., 2007)

Monday, November 3, 2014dataset
Dates Collected: 
Monday, November 3, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
bedload, bouldersCC-BY
Rice Pile ExperimentsMartin, Raleigh L., Paola, Chris, Jerolmack, Douglas J.Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota

Experiments on stochastic avalanching of rice pile as analogue to sediment transport fluctuations.  The rice pile is formed in a narrow chamber (width ≈ 2 cm) separated by two flat glass walls (height, width ≈ 30 cm).  Rice grains are fed by a custom-built screw feeder controlled by Microsoft VBA script determining rate of rotation of screw feeder (which increases linearly with feed rate of grains).  Resulting flux of rice grains out of pile is determined by scale below outlet which records weight every one second.  Flux can be determined by differences in scale weight between time steps.  A vacuum set to blower mode periodically clears particles from the scale.

Two types of experiments were performed:

  1. Steady feed (constant rate of particle additions to rice pile).
  2. Unsteady feed (sinusoidal, sawtooth, or square wave feeding of particles to rice pile).  Different amplitudes and periods of fluctuations among experiments.

Excel spreadsheet (included as internet resource below) describes parameters for all experiments.  "Raw data" folder includes timeseries (recorded or interpolated to 1 Hz) of cumulative mass (in grams) of rice particles on weigh scale.  Data need to be "cleaned" to remove signal of periodic vacuum blower used to remove rice particles.

More information is available here: http://sedexp.net/experiment/one-dimensional-rice-pile-avalanche

Tuesday, September 16, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823139, -93.25469129999999

Dates Collected: 
Friday, April 13, 2007 to Thursday, July 12, 2007
Tuesday, December 4, 2007 to Wednesday, February 20, 2008
Monday, August 4, 2008 to Wednesday, November 26, 2008
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 to Monday, July 20, 2009
Friday, October 30, 2009 to Monday, November 30, 2009
Monday, July 11, 2011 to Monday, July 25, 2011
Name: 
Raleigh L. Martin
Institution: 
University of California, Los Angeles
contributor_email: 
raleighmartin@gmail.com
CC-BY
St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at The University of Minnesota
Laboratory abrasion mills to study river incision into bedrockSklar, Leonard, S.University of California, Berkeley

Data from the manuscript Sklar and Dietrich, Sediment and rock strength controls on river incision into bedrock, Geology, v. 29, no. 12, p. 1087-1090.

Friday, September 5, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 42.4447319, -84.0649732

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, January 1, 2000 to Monday, January 1, 2001
Name: 
Sklar, Leonard, S.
Institution: 
San Francisco State University
contributor_email: 
leonard@sfsu.edu
rivers, sediment supply, grain size, erodibility, landscape evolution, erosionCC-BY
Fluvial bedrock incision by suspended and bedload sedimentScheingross, Joel S.California Institute of TechnologyFriday, August 15, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 34.1376576, -118.125269

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 15, 2014
Name: 
Scheingross, Joel S.
Institution: 
California Institute of Technology
contributor_email: 
jscheingross@caltech.edu
bedload, suspended load, sediment, fluvial, bedrock, flumeCC-BY
Incipient sediment motion across the river to debris-flow transitionPrancevic, Jeff P.

Laboratory experiments on initial sediment motion that cross the river to debris-flow sediment-transport transition. Results show that initial sediment motion by river processes requires heightened dimensionless bed shear stress (or critical Shields stress) with increasing channel-bed slope by as much as fivefold the conventional criterion established for lowland rivers.

Friday, August 15, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 34.1376576, -118.125269

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 15, 2014
Name: 
Prancevic, Jeff P.
Institution: 
California Institute of Technology
contributor_email: 
jprancev@caltech.edu
CC-BY
2d bedload transport experiments with glass spheresMartin, Raleigh L.University of Pennsylvania
Experiments with marbles in Penn Sediment Dynamics flume.  Steady water and particle feed for each experiment, but variations in particle feed rate among experiments.
 
Channel width ~19 cm, particles only slightly smaller (D1 ~ 12 mm, D2 ~ 16 mm).  Thus, dynamics are quasi-2d.
 
Three types of image data captured:
1. High speed videos (with frame rates ranging from 240-1000 Hz) captured with Phantom High Speed camera.  These were intended to capture dynamics of particle collisions and damage propogation.
 
2. Time lapse photos (with frame rates ranging from 0.1-0.5 Hz) captured with Nikon D5000 (for experiments up to 26Jan2013) and Nikon D5200 (for subsequent experiments).  These were intended to explore evolution of the sedimentary bed and particle waiting times through time.
 
3. Webcam videos (with frame rate of 30 Hz) captured with Logitech webcam.  The webcam was set up at the end of the flume, and it is hoped that these videos can help to extract the particle flux.
 
Not all types of data were collected for all experiments.  The details of the individual experiments can be found in the "Notes" files with the associated dates of the experiments.
 
The "RawData" folders contain the original images from the various cameras (as well as the associated settings files for creating these images).  The "ProcessedData" folders contain processed images (cropped and rotated) for the relavant imaging area.  They also contain esimates of bed surface elevations and particle centroids determined by image analysis.
 
The experiments with TimeLapse have been renamed for publication, with the title including the feed rate for the experiments.  These are:
S12 -- 16Jul2013
S30 -- combined 2Nov2012 and 13Nov2012
S60 -- 26Jan2013
S90 -- 09Aug2013
S120 -- 31Jul2013
 
The "ProcessedData" folders also contain the scripts used for processing the data.  This has been done by a combination of Fiji (.ijm), Python (.py), and MATLAB (.m) scripts.  The '09Aug2013' folder contains the latest scripts for analysis of timelapse experiments.  The important ones are:
 
MODULE_images.py -- a module to be called by other Python scripts when processing the images
process_timelapse.py -- rotates and crops images, then spits them back out into "ProcessedImages" folder as .jpgs.  Note: need to look at some raw images to get parameters for processing.
extract_bedsurface.py -- reads in processed images and estimates bed surface elevation (in pixels), spits out text files into "BedSurface" with bed surface elevations. Note, need to look at some processed to get parameters for processing.
particles_FIJI.ijm -- reads in processed images and determines centroids (in pixels) of all particles.  Avoids particles on edges of image.  Spits out .csv files with these coordinates into "Particles" folder.  Note, need to look at some raw images to get parameters for processing.
BedSurfaceMATLABimport.m -- reads in .txt bed surface pixel elevations and converts to bed surface elevations in mm in a single .mat file which can be used for subsequent analysis
ParticlesMATLABimport.m -- reads in .csv particle files and links together into particle trajectories, saving as a single .mat file with all positions trajectories in mm.
 
The two "useful" processed data files are "[DATE]_BedSurface.mat" (with bed surface elevations) and "[DATE]_Particles.mat" with particle trajectories.
 
See the '26Jan2013' processed data folder for most up-to-date scripts for processing high-speed videos.  Probably, it would be better to use some of the scripts described above for these data, but I just haven't had the chance to revisit the high-speed videos in a while.  The functions of the scripts are pretty self-explanatory from the titles.  The data contained in the folder are:
 
'V[].mat' contains particle trajectory information.  Similar to the "[DATE]_Particles.mat" file described above for time-lapse.  'V[].xls' contains the particle centroids determined by Fiji image analysis.  'V[]_bedsurface.mat' contains bed surface elevations, similar to file described above for time-lapse.  'V[]_movie.mat' and '....tif' contain movies of particle motions as cartoons with hollow spheres and particle identifiers instead of the raw images.  Useful for locating particle indices when looking at the trajectory files for analysis.
 
Friday, January 10, 2014dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 39.9507247, -75.191285

Dates Collected: 
Friday, November 2, 2012 to Wednesday, July 31, 2013
Name: 
Martin, Raleigh L.
Institution: 
University of Pennsylvania; University of California Los Angeles
contributor_email: 
raleighm@atmos.ucla.edu
sediment transport, bed load, bed evolutionCC-BY
Project Kinect C# versionKline, GregThe University of Texas at Austin

A freeware C# version of a highly successful LabVIEW VI by the same author.  Lets any Windows Kinect be turned into a topography scanner.

Saturday, December 21, 2013Software
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2861062, -97.7393634

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, December 21, 2013
Name: 
Greg Kline
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
rwing27@hotmail.com
CC-BY
Community Experiment: Stratodynamics 2013Sediment Experimentalists

Delta growth on differential bathymetry

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 32.7861288, 129.86465859999998

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
sedimentexp@gmail.com
deltaCC-BY
Vertical sorting in bed formsBlom, Astrid WL Delft Hydraulics, The Netherlands

Two sets of flume experiments were conducted to examine grain size selective transport and vertical sorting in conditions with migrating bed forms and bed load transport. In the two sets of experiments we used a sediment mixture from the river Rhine and a trimodal mixture, respectively. The vertical sorting profiles showed a downward coarsening trend within the bed forms, and in some experiments an essentially immobile coarse bed layer formed underneath the migrating bed forms.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 51.9987925, 4.3755870999999615

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, December 21, 2013
Name: 
Astrid Blom
Institution: 
WL Delft Hydraulics, The Netherlands
contributor_email: 
astrid.blom@tudelft.nl
CC-BY
Morphodynamics on iceNaito, KensukeHokkaido University, Japan

Experiments to study boundary waves formed on ice surfaces.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 43.0721697, 141.3418792

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, January 1, 2011 to Sunday, January 1, 2012
Name: 
Naito, Kensuke
Institution: 
Hokkaido University, Japan
contributor_email: 
kensuke.g.naito@gmail.com
CC-BY
Experimental alluvial fan evolution: Channel dynamics, slope controls, and shoreline growthReitz, MeredithUniversity of Pennsylvania

We describe the growth of a series of experimental alluvial fans composed of a noncohesive grain mixture bimodal in size and density. We impose conditions that simulate a gravel/sand fan prograding into a static basin with constant water and sediment influx, and the resulting fans display realistic channelization and avulsion dynamics. Collected at the Penn Sediment Dynamics Laboratory.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 39.9507247, -75.191285

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 to Thursday, January 1, 2009
Name: 
Meredith Reitz
Institution: 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
contributor_email: 
mreitz@ldeo.columbia.edu
CC-BY
Community Experiment: Experimental Stratigraphy 2012Sediment Experimentalists

STEP basin experiment with two different wavelengths of sediment discharge fluctuations. Community experiment at the first Sediment Experimentalists Workshop. University of Texas at Austin, Morphodynamics Lab, Sediment Transport and Earth-surface Processes (STEP) Basin

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.3855901, -97.7236211

Dates Collected: 
Monday, December 10, 2012 to Wednesday, December 12, 2012
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta@jsg.utexas.edu
deltaCC-BY
Deltas with Waves and TidesAbeyta, Antoinette; Baumgardner, SarahUniversity of Minnesota

Construction of deltas with different materials and wave and tide conditions.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823831, -93.25481289999999

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, January 1, 2011 to Sunday, January 1, 2012
Name: 
Antoinette Abeyta
Institution: 
University of Minnesota
contributor_email: 
abey0003@umn.edu
,
Name: 
Sarah Baumgardner
Institution: 
University of Minnesota
contributor_email: 
baum0423@umn.edu
deltaCC-BY
Dynamics of Steady-State Drainage Basins: An Experimental ApproachLes HasbargenUniversity of Minnesota

Time lapse imagery of small experimental landforms, and statistics on land form and erosion rates.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9824832, -93.25508589999998

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, July 1, 2001 to Wednesday, August 1, 2001
Name: 
Les Harbargen
Institution: 
SUNY Oneonta
contributor_email: 
Leslie.Hasbargen@oneonta.edu
CC-BY
Meandering in coarse-bedded riversChristian BraudrickUniversity of California, Berkeley

We report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. Measurements include discharge, channel width, sinuosity change, and channel position through time.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.9169912, -122.32991520000002

Dates Collected: 
Monday, January 1, 2007 to Tuesday, January 1, 2008
Name: 
Christian Braudrick
Institution: 
University of California, Berkeley
contributor_email: 
xian@berkeley.edu
CC-BY
StreamLab - Sediment Patch DynamicsPeter NelsonUniversity of California, Berkeley

In conjunction with the alternate bar, armoring, and gravel augmentation experiments, we conducted research investigating the development of bed surface grain size patches.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823831, -93.25481289999999

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, January 1, 2006 to Monday, January 1, 2007
Name: 
Peter Nelson
Institution: 
Colorado State University
contributor_email: 
peteranelson@gmail.com
CC-BY
Gravel diffusion experimentsRaleigh MartinUniversity of Pennsylvania

Video tracking of individual gravel particles across fixed rough bed.  Collected at the Penn Sediment Dynamics Laboratory.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 39.9507247, -75.191285

Dates Collected: 
Monday, March 1, 2010 to Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Name: 
Raleigh Martin
Institution: 
University of Pennsylvania
contributor_email: 
raleighmartin@gmail.com
CC-BY
Bedform adjustment experimentsRaleigh L. MartinUniversity of Pennsylvania

Recirculating flume experiments tracking evolution of sand bedforms through repeat 2d sonar scans.  Experiments track change in bedform geometries across abrupt and gradual discharge changes.

Saturday, December 21, 2013dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823831, -93.25481289999999

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2011 to Wednesday, August 31, 2011
Name: 
Raleigh Martin
Institution: 
University of Pennsylvania
contributor_email: 
raleighmartin@gmail.com
bedform, dunes, ripples, sediment transportCC-BY
Data Acquisition Carriage, Tilting Bed Flume, Saint Anthony Falls LaboratoryBedform development in recirculating flumeSt. Anthony Falls Laboratory at The University of Minnesota2d topographic scan with sonar
Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution ObservatoryStephen DeLongInstitute of the Environment, University of Arizona

Overarching goals are to study co-evolution of hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemistry, ecology, microbiology, atmospheric science in a long term experiment, to balance the water budget in real time, and to predict how coupled Earth systems respond to various climate scenarios.

Saturday, December 21, 2013collection
Location: 

Geolocation is 32.5887582, -110.83787039999999

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012 to Thursday, September 1, 2022
Name: 
Stephen DeLong
Institution: 
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
CC-BY
Debris flow erosion experimentsLeslie HsuUniversity of California, Berkeley

Experiments in a 4-meter diameter, 80-cm wide vertically rotating flume to study bedrock erosion by debris flows. Force plate, height, bedrock topography, video, and image data.

Friday, September 23, 2016dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.9132931, -122.33408099999997

Dates Collected: 
Tuesday, January 13, 2015
Name: 
Leslie Hsu
Institution: 
U.S. Geological Survey
contributor_email: 
hsu.leslie@gmail.com
drum flume, granular flows, Richmond Field Station, basal force, erosion, particle dynamicsCC0
Acuity AR4000 Laser Scanner, Interface Force Model SWP10-5K-B000 Precision Force TransducerDebris flow erosion experimentsRichmond Field Station at The University of California, BerkeleyBasal force measurement in the UC Berkeley debris flow drum, Overhead video measurement, Camera-laser topography measurement, Laser height profile measurement, Making synthetic bedrock for erosion experiments - Hsu