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Title Creator Institution Body Date Last Updated Resource Type Coverage Related Resources Contributors Keywords Rights management Data & Papers Related Wikis
Minibasin Formation Due to Sediment Loading Over a Mobile Substrate Brandon Minton The University of Texas at Austin Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.3877436, -97.72813300000001

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Brandon Minton
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
turbidity, mobile substrate, subsidence, minibasin CC-BY
Architecture of a Delta Prograding on a Mobile Substrate Jung, Eunsil The University of Texas at Austin Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Kim, Wonsuck
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta, mobile substrate, Salt CC-BY
Delft3D_Tides Rossi, Valentina M. Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Edmonds, Douglas
Institution: 
Indiana University
contributor_email: 
,
Name: 
Kim, Wonsuck
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
CC-BY
Lateral-tilting basin Woong Mo Koo The University of Texas at Austin Wednesday, December 3, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2849185, -97.7340567

Dates Collected: 
Monday, October 6, 2014 to Monday, November 17, 2014
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
,
Name: 
Valentina Rossi
Institution: 
The University of Texas at Austin
Deepwater deposits, lateral-tilting CC-BY
VeggieTales experiments Piliouras, Anastasia University of Texas at Austin

We examined the effects of vegetation, vegetation density, and veg location on overall delta and channel dynamics. We conducted a series of experiments with a variety of seeding styles, including 1 unvegetated control run. Experiments were all conducted under the same water and sediment input conditions, with vegetation as the only variable.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2806543, -97.7327641

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, September 1, 2013 to Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Name: 
Anastasia Piliouras
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta, vegetation CC-BY
Flood/Interflood Delta Evolution Experiments in STEP Basin Litwin Miller, Kimberly University of Texas at Austin Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Name: 
Kimberly Miller
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
,
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
delta, Floods, Walnut Shell CC-BY
The Progradation of a Delta on a Mobile Substrate: Experiment Carolina Baumanis University of Texas at Austin

We conducted a series of experiments at the University of Texas at Austin to discover the effect of a mobile substrate on an evolving delta. All of the runs had constant sediment supply, water supply, and base level, but varied mobile substrate thicknesses.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.3953085, -97.73627420000003

Dates Collected: 
Friday, June 1, 2012 to Friday, August 10, 2012
Name: 
Wonsuck Kim
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
stratigraphy, progradation, mobile substrate, experiment, delta CC-BY
Laboratory experiments simulating the geomorphic response to tectonic uplift Lague, Dimitri, Crave, Alain, Davy, Philippe Geosciences Rennes

We present the results of an experimental study of topography dynamics under conditions of constant precipitation and uplift rate. The experiment is designed to develop a complete drainage network by the growth and propagation of erosion instabilities in response to tectonic perturbations. The quantitative analysis of topographic evolution is made possible by using telemetric lasers that perform elevation measurements at an excellent level of precision. We focus our study on the effect of initial surface organization and of uplift rate on both the transient dynamics and the steady state forms of topography. We show that the transient phase is strongly dependent on the initial internally drained area, which is found to decrease exponentially with time. The topography always reaches a steady state whose mean elevation depends linearly on uplift rate with a strictly positive value when uplift is zero. Steady state surfaces are characterized by a well-defined slope–area power law with a constant exponent of 0.12 and an amplitude that depends linearly on uplift rate with a strictly positive value when uplift is zero. These results are consistent with a stream power law erosion model that includes a nonnegligible threshold for particle detachment. Uncertainty regarding the sediment transport length is resolved by calibrating the transient dynamics with a surface process model. Reappraising published results on the linear dependency between mean elevation, or relief, and denudation rate, we suggest that an erosion threshold is worth considering for large-scale systems.

Sunday, November 30, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 48.1132044, -1.6616030999999793

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, November 30, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
landscape evolution, topography, relief, experimental modeling, tectonic geomorphology CC-BY
Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifuge Hung, Chi-Yao; Stark, Colin P., Capart, H.; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments.  We scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking, and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. 
 
For more information, contact Colin Stark at - cstark@ldeo.columbia.edu.
Monday, November 10, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 40.8092739, -73.9598315

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, August 1, 2013 to Monday, November 10, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
debris flow, erosion, analogue modeling, physical modeling CC-BY
Basin Depth Control on the Fluvial Autogenic Processes of Deltaic Systems Kim, Wonsuck, Carlson, Brandee University of Texas at Austin

Data includes results from a series of delta-building experiments designed to determine the response of these internal processes and timescales to varying basin water depth. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2806543, -97.7327641

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 to Thursday, November 6, 2014
delta, STEP, basin depth CC-BY
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