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Title Creator Institution Body Date Last Updated Resource Type Coverage Related Resources Contributors Keywords Rights management Data & Papers Related Wikis
Basin Depth Control on the Fluvial Autogenic Processes of Deltaic Systems Kim, Wonsuck, Carlson, Brandee University of Texas at Austin

Data includes results from a series of delta-building experiments designed to determine the response of these internal processes and timescales to varying basin water depth. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.2806543, -97.7327641

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 to Thursday, November 6, 2014
delta, STEP, basin depth CC-BY
Sorting in Flash Flood Bore Experiments Kealie Goodwin University of Texas at Austin

Laboratory experiments which use a series of truncated bores to understand the effects of steep water surface slope on gravel bed armor development. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 30.267153, -97.74306079999997

Dates Collected: 
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Name: 
Kealie Goodwin
Institution: 
University of Texas at Austin
contributor_email: 
flash flood, gravel, bed sorting, armoring, kinetic sieving, selective transport CC-BY
SEN Community Experiment at Utrecht University Sediment Experimentalists Utrecht University

Community experiment at Utrecht University, two deltas, one on a mobile substrate. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 52.0880383030119, 5.166864752736728

Dates Collected: 
Monday, November 3, 2014 to Thursday, November 6, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
delta, mobile substrate, Eurotank CC-BY
Bedload transport though vegetation Yager, Elowyn M., Schmeeckle, Mark Arizona State University

Experiments using simulated vegetation to understand how different vegetation densities (0-4% density by area) modify near-bed flow turbulence, flow structures and bedload transport.  Data include spatial variation in bedload fluxes around vegetation and total bedload fluxes measured using high-speed video for 12 runs.  Near-bed flow instantaneous velocities and velocity profiles (streamwise and vertical directions) were also measured in 3 streamwise transects using PIV. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: 

Geolocation is 33.4255104, -111.94000540000002

Dates Collected: 
Sunday, January 1, 2006 to Friday, June 1, 2007
Name: 
Elowyn Yager
Institution: 
University of Idaho
contributor_email: 
bedload, vegetation, turbulence, flow structures CC-BY
Bedrock erosion by granular flow in the Maytag flume Hsu, Leslie University of California, Berkeley
We conducted laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that bedrock erosion is related to grain collisional stresses which scale with shear rate and particle size. We placed granular material in a 56-cm-diameter rotating drum to explore the relationship between erosion of a synthetic bedrock sample and variables such as grain size, shear rate, water content, and bed strength. Grain collisional stresses are estimated as the inertial stress using the product of the squares of particle size and vertical shear rate. Our uniform granular material consisted of 1-mm sand and quartzite river gravel with means of 4, 6, or 10 mm. In 67 experimental runs, the eroded depth of the bed sample varied with inertial stresses in the granular flow to a power less than 1.0 and inversely with the bed strength. The flows tended to slip on smooth boundaries, resulting in higher erosion rates than no-slip cases. We found that lateral wall resistance generated shear across the channel, producing two cells whose widths depended on wall roughness.
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 37.9153639, -122.33468490000001

Dates Collected: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2003 to Thursday, January 1, 2004
Name: 
Hsu, Leslie
Institution: 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
contributor_email: 
granular flow, gravel, bedrock, erosion CC-BY
Bed load transport in steep boulder bed channels Yager, Elowyn University of California, Berkeley

We designed a set of flume experiments with a simple, well-defined bed configuration to test our modified sediment transport equation. The experiments were conducted in a small (15 cm wide, 4.5 m long) flume set at a gradient of ten percent. This is the steepest gradient at which fluvial processes have been hypothesized to dominate over debris flow scour and deposition. At this gradient, the influence of the immobile grains on the flow and sediment transport will be relatively large. Thus our experiments should provide a test of sediment transport equations at the limit of their applicability. We maintained a constant slope in our experiments to enable comparisons between all experimental runs. The flume bed consisted of two layers of 30 mm immobile spheres: a closely packed bottom layer (λ/D of 1) and a top layer in which λ/D varied from 1 to 5 in the different runs. (Yager et al., 2007)

Monday, November 3, 2014 dataset
Dates Collected: 
Monday, November 3, 2014
Name: 
Sediment Experimentalist
contributor_email: 
bedload, boulders CC-BY
Rice Pile Experiments Martin, Raleigh L., Paola, Chris, Jerolmack, Douglas J. Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota

Experiments on stochastic avalanching of rice pile as analogue to sediment transport fluctuations.  The rice pile is formed in a narrow chamber (width ≈ 2 cm) separated by two flat glass walls (height, width ≈ 30 cm).  Rice grains are fed by a custom-built screw feeder controlled by Microsoft VBA script determining rate of rotation of screw feeder (which increases linearly with feed rate of grains).  Resulting flux of rice grains out of pile is determined by scale below outlet which records weight every one second.  Flux can be determined by differences in scale weight between time steps.  A vacuum set to blower mode periodically clears particles from the scale.

Two types of experiments were performed:

  1. Steady feed (constant rate of particle additions to rice pile).
  2. Unsteady feed (sinusoidal, sawtooth, or square wave feeding of particles to rice pile).  Different amplitudes and periods of fluctuations among experiments.

Excel spreadsheet (included as internet resource below) describes parameters for all experiments.  "Raw data" folder includes timeseries (recorded or interpolated to 1 Hz) of cumulative mass (in grams) of rice particles on weigh scale.  Data need to be "cleaned" to remove signal of periodic vacuum blower used to remove rice particles.

More information is available here: http://sedexp.net/experiment/one-dimensional-rice-pile-avalanche

Tuesday, September 16, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 44.9823139, -93.25469129999999

Dates Collected: 
Friday, April 13, 2007 to Thursday, July 12, 2007
Tuesday, December 4, 2007 to Wednesday, February 20, 2008
Monday, August 4, 2008 to Wednesday, November 26, 2008
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 to Monday, July 20, 2009
Friday, October 30, 2009 to Monday, November 30, 2009
Monday, July 11, 2011 to Monday, July 25, 2011
Name: 
Raleigh L. Martin
Institution: 
University of California, Los Angeles
contributor_email: 
CC-BY St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at The University of Minnesota
Laboratory abrasion mills to study river incision into bedrock Sklar, Leonard, S. University of California, Berkeley

Data from the manuscript Sklar and Dietrich, Sediment and rock strength controls on river incision into bedrock, Geology, v. 29, no. 12, p. 1087-1090.

Friday, September 5, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 42.4447319, -84.0649732

Dates Collected: 
Saturday, January 1, 2000 to Monday, January 1, 2001
Name: 
Sklar, Leonard, S.
Institution: 
San Francisco State University
contributor_email: 
rivers, sediment supply, grain size, erodibility, landscape evolution, erosion CC-BY
Fluvial bedrock incision by suspended and bedload sediment Scheingross, Joel S. California Institute of Technology Friday, August 15, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 34.1376576, -118.125269

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 15, 2014
Name: 
Scheingross, Joel S.
Institution: 
California Institute of Technology
contributor_email: 
bedload, suspended load, sediment, fluvial, bedrock, flume CC-BY
Incipient sediment motion across the river to debris-flow transition Prancevic, Jeff P.

Laboratory experiments on initial sediment motion that cross the river to debris-flow sediment-transport transition. Results show that initial sediment motion by river processes requires heightened dimensionless bed shear stress (or critical Shields stress) with increasing channel-bed slope by as much as fivefold the conventional criterion established for lowland rivers.

Friday, August 15, 2014 dataset
Location: 

Geolocation is 34.1376576, -118.125269

Dates Collected: 
Friday, August 15, 2014
Name: 
Prancevic, Jeff P.
Institution: 
California Institute of Technology
contributor_email: 
CC-BY
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